TRANSCRIPT Episode 2: Meditation – dwelling on Gods truth

Delight Podcast Transcript Accessibility Delight Podcast for new Christians and encouragement for others with Adam Curtis and Leah sax

Leah Sax:
Hello and welcome to Episode two of Delight Podcast, I’m Leah Sax, and this is Adam Curtis. Hello. And together we are looking at practices and habits that especially help new Christians live for Jesus.

Adam Curtis:
Indeed, we are in episode one we looked at the Bible with our good friend Adam Thrift. And now here in Episode two, our minds are going to turn to the topic of Christian meditation.

Hello and welcome to our guest today, the wonderful Amy Wicks

Leah Sax:
Indeed welcome, lovely Wicksy. Now, Wicksy, my first memory of you is when we are our weekend training for our summer camp. And within about four and a half seconds of meeting me, you pointed your finger when you are going to be doing morning entertainments for ever.

Amy Wicks:
Hi guys. Yeah, nice to be with you. I put that down to just excellent judge of character. I’ll go with that.

Adam Curtis:
Is it interesting, as I now think about it, because my first memory of you too Wicks was you doing the morning ents at this summer camp, which we all help out where you were dressed up as a pirate, I believe, dancing around the stage. And then each evening you used to do a different dance as some Essex based gangster.

Amy Wicks:
I mean, that doesn’t sound outside the realms of possibility.

Adam Curtis:
Thanks so much for coming on to the Delight Podcast and sharing your wisdom. Before we delve into our topic today of meditation Can we just hear a bit more about you and your story?

Amy Wicks:
Yeah, it’s great to be with you and thinking about this topic. So, yeah, I grew up in a small town in Essex and have been going to church all my life. So I remember growing up enjoying church and enjoying being around Christians and knowing what I was hearing was true in some ways. So, you know, this kind of Bible stories that we hear and in church when we’re children are sort of sorts of quite famous ones and I never doubted that those weren’t true. There was definitely a time when I was about 12. I can’t remember exactly how old I was. And I heard someone explain that to go to heaven, we needed to know Jesus. And really that was the first time that that had been clear to me. And I realised that I needed to know Jesus myself and that that thing that I’d grown up with wasn’t just sort of something I inherited, knowing Jesus personally and and trust in him for myself. So I think I was about 12 when that became a reality for me. And plodded along through my teenage years pretty pretty happily.

Adam Curtis:
Were you quite a cool teenager?

Amy Wicks:
On the opposite, like a total square, a total square,

Adam Curtis:
You say trendy now, I wonder if that was just a life

Amy Wicks:
Like it was the 90s, guys. So a fashion was not good. Haircuts were not good. Like, yeah, there’s a lot of photos that I’ve, like, got rid of recently. And, you know, it was just, you know, it was a chill time before smartphones. So, yeah, I was just pretty square and happily went to school, has some good friends and the really got to university and went to a church and started hearing the Bible being taught really just really kind of clearly like having bits of the Bible explained to me in a way that I hadn’t really heard before, just like to really grow as a Christian. And I think that’s that is the time when my my faith kind of really started to become deep. And that, I think, has been the story then of the last the last 20 years, really, and just growing in kind of depth of love for the Lord Jesus and understanding of what it is to be a Christian. So there we go. That’s my story up until now.

Adam Curtis:
Thank you. Thank you for sharing. Can I just push you a little bit. So you spoke about when you were a teenager and going to church and enjoying that time and trusting in Jesus. But there was a difference then when you went to university and studied your faith became a lot deeper. What was the difference between that teenager faith and that university faith? What does that feel like what did that look like?

Amy Wicks:
I think it was a difference between having a simple understanding of what of what I believed, but not a lot of ideas about how that really affected me day to day because I was like a total square. So I was just like a bit of a goody goody two shoes growing up. So life looked pretty… It didn’t look very wild. So I was kind of good because I was boring.

Adam Curtis:
Yeah.

Amy Wicks:
You know, I’m like a rule keeper, like, you know, that’s, you know, temperament wise, wasn’t really having to kind of grapple with actually ow does this work out necessarily In my day to day. The depth I’m talking about is just having a kind of more profound understanding of what the good news of Christianity is and what the good news of Jesus is to seae ways, that it was changing me Really on the inside as a person and not just at surface level. Cos in lots of ways you can you can do lots of things like on the outside, but that can be very good and holy and in lots of ways that’s quite easy. She’s really being changed on the inside in a way that is sort of changing your character in the way that you see the world and the way that you connect what you believe to just how you feel about things that happen in life. All those things.

Leah Sax:
Wicksy you’ve spoken about how an internal change has had a practical outworking. Are there any specific examples you can think of that show, how Jesus was at work changing you?

Amy Wicks:
I’ve talked quite a lot about sin and use and to talk about the way that basically the way that we’ve treated God and we have kind of ignored him and stuck our hand up to his face and said, we don’t want we don’t want anything to do with you. And I hadn’t really thought about myself that way. And I thought that so again, because I was like Miss Goody Two shoes, and when I thought about the good news of Jesus and that he brings forgiveness for your sin, I basically thought when he didn’t have to do a lot for me, so he’d be pretty chuffed to have me on his team because I was like an easy win.

Leah Sax:
Oh, I love your honesty.

Amy Wicks:
it’s awful when you say it out loud.

Leah Sax:
Yeah, it’s absolutely brilliant. But true

Amy Wicks:
Becuase I hadn’t really understood yet what it was to be a human being and to kind of not love God the way I should and those and those kind of things. That was I think that was very clear memories coming to an understanding of that for the first time.

Leah Sax:
Thanks for that. Now, I’d like to ask two questions, if I may. Now, the first one is, I know you are currently completing your degree in theology, your second degree. So I deeply desperate to know your first degree with it. And secondly, I’d love to know the difference between your two university experiences, between that kind of more secular environment and this very Christian environment that you have just been in over the last few years.

Amy Wicks:
Does anyone ever try and guess what degree is? Well Leah it is quite obvious with you because of your job.

Leah Sax:
I shout it from the houses,

Amy Wicks:
I don’t know. But yet everyone always thinks I did English languages as I did economics. I studied economics,

Leah Sax:
What?! That is amazing Wicksy.

Amy Wicks:
With a bunch of a bunch of pretty nerdy boys and. Yeah.

Adam Curtis:
How now you’ve gone to college with more nerdy boys.

Amy Wicks:
Yeah. Yeah. That’s interesting. Yeah. That was Yeah. Pretty intense degree and I didn’t understand a lot of it. This degree is different and then it’s, it is different doing a degree that is all about what you believe and kind of so core to who you are as a person because all the lectures I’m in and sometimes it’s more obvious than others, but all the lectures I’m in have a direct impact not just on the work that I’m going to go and do and and the things I’ll be doing at Church of the Degree. But they have an impact on on kind of how I understand my faith and and then how I live it out. So it’s been confronting at times. I guess it’s different in that sense because. Although the exams don’t matter. What you read really matters and you care about it, and, yeah, so that’s that’s different.

Adam Curtis:
OK, so this is another side of like growing and maturing isn’t it, is the things we read. They confront us and they they change us. So maybe in this more intense time, even college, how has that been changing in you?

Amy Wicks:
I, I think it comes back to that idea of kind of depth and an inward inward change. I think for me, the thing that I’ve been thinking about most this year, in fact, we had a chat about this on the phone recently that Adam is thinking about yeah, always fun, is thinking about humility as a Christian, what it means to be growing in character as a Christian rather than just being busy doing lots of kind of Christian activity. It’s confronting because I think it’s an area that maybe I haven’t given the right amount of attention to before but also I’ve really changed the way that I understand kind of how we grow as a Christian and how that then affects our or the fancy word, the fancy read in the books that I’ve been reading. It’s intellectual humility.

Adam Curtis:
Lovely.

Amy Wicks:
Yeah. Drop that into conversation.

Leah Sax:
That that’s a nice one,

Amy Wicks:
But that basically means kind of being humble in the way that we think about ideas and the way that we understand the world and our opinions about not just Christian things could be about anything. So how we think about politics and how we think about, I mean, everything that’s going on in the world at the moment, I think one of the things that we see in the world is. Not a lot of intellectual humility, so everyone thinks they are right in their opinion, and they hold their opinions really tightly makes the kind of conversations that we have quite abrasive and they’re not very nice to be in. The way that people talk to each other on Twitter is kind of brutal and and people are very quick to judge each other. But when you think about it, we can’t all be right all the time. And just that simple realisation that I’m probably wrong about something I think drastically changes the approach you have then to people who disagree with you and put that into a Christian context, where you start thinking about growing as a Christian and the fact that we’re kind of growing to become more like Jesus and process and we make progress in it. So thinking more about what it means to be to be humble in that process, that’s been the thing that I’ve spent the whole year talking about to people, because I’ve I’ve I’ve found it really challenging.

Adam Curtis:
That is really helpful. And and it’s interesting, isn’t it, how how strong the allure is of like of practice being like if I focus on my practice, if I focus on the things I do, then I can make these these changes my ministry life and my social life, my personal life and oh, look how I’ve grown. And it might be those practices are good. I wouldn’t notice them, but it’s much harder to work on our character, much harder to work on our humility, because these are things which is the very heart of who we are rather than just the workings of who we are.

Amy Wicks:
Yeah, I think that’s exactly it. And part of that humility is recognising that we have progress to make. And we have thought about things wrongly in the past that requires kind of vulnerability to be able to say, actually, I was wrong about that or change my mind about that. Those are phrases that are not easily part of our conversation. But once you allow them to be this kind of avenue for learning and growing and doing that with other people in a way that is really collaborative and enjoyable, even

Adam Curtis:
That is so true. And what I find particularly helpful is the fact that this demonstrates how Christian growth and Christian maturity is an ongoing process. Just thinking about your story, there was the importance of growing up in the church of the importance of meeting Jesus. When you’re 12, then the importance of going to to a church at university, which really drove you deep into God’s word. And then there’s the continuous importance of still learning and growing and developing. It’s not like we ever hit the endpoint.

Amy Wicks:
I think that’s exactly right.

Adam Curtis:
We’ve still got more to learn.

Amy Wicks:
And if we think we’ve hit the endpoint, I mean, that just sounds like a recipe for arrogance, which is deeply unattractive in anybody. Whereas the understanding that we haven’t hit the hit the endpoint. And I think there’s a kind of gentleness in in our character that. Again, you don’t see it very much these days, but is this really attractive I think.

Leah Sax:
Amy we’re coming to our topic for today now, which is meditation. Now it’s a word that I feel like I hear quite a lot, especially associated with, say, yoga and mindfulness. It’s like a buzzword I see everywhere. It does kind of beg the question, is it something that we’ve adopted from other traditions or is this part of the Christian life the way of living for Jesus?

Amy Wicks:
It’s a really that’s a really great question. Have we just adopted something? Well, so cards on the table, I’m going to say, no, I don’t I don’t think we have. We might be using a word that is more common today that maybe Christians wouldn’t have used hundreds of years ago. They might not have talked about meditation, although I don’t I don’t know that for sure. Maybe kind of contemplation. Christians aren’t afraid to talk about spirituality. So similar ideas. I think the key thing is we mean something quite different when we talk about meditation. It might sound like the same idea, but we mean something quite different.

Leah Sax:
But so what do we mean That’s quite different by it. Could you just call it a Christian version of mindfulness? Do you fancy having a go at definition Amy?

Amy Wicks:
Yeah. And I think that I think the key difference is who is it focused on and and what are we actually doing in meditation? So I think in kind of mindfulness meditation or Buddhist meditation, first of all, they would say it’s not about emptying their minds. They’re very clear about that. But in terms of what they’re focusing their mind on, it’s a lot about being aware, first of all, of your body. So paying attention to your breathing and your well, how do your muscles feel today and all those kind of things that have some health benefits? And that’s you know, I find that quite interesting. And then a lot of it is what is really paying attention to your your feelings and your thoughts, trying to become aware of, like, what’s stressing you out or how do you feel about the situation and those kind of things. One person says the aim is to become kind of self-possessed, so able to kind of manage your emotions better and your reactions to different situations, that kind of thing. Mindfulness, it’s not about emptying your mind, but it’s about paying attention to yourself so that you can basically better manage yourself. And I thought that phrase self-possessed was really.

Leah Sax:
Yeah, totally.

Amy Wicks:
Was really telling the difference. I think with Christian meditation or contemplation or if you want to call it, is that we are trying to focus our thoughts on on God and fill our minds with truth about God. And then we’re trying to see or think about how those truths really connect to all of life and changes from the inside out so that we can live with God as our as our heavenly father. So maybe there’s some there’s there’s some similarities in the sense of wanting to see a change in and how we live. But really, it’s focused on us is the big difference.

Adam Curtis:
Right. And that really is interesting. Yeah. What you’re saying there, maybe that it’s not just about us focusing on ourselves, which mindfulness is pushing forward and understanding ourselves as helpful as that can be. But us. Yeah, dwelling intentionally upon the upon the divine is just saying that I my mind immediately goes to like Colossians Chapter three, verses one and two where set your minds on that which is above. So your heart on that which is is above. I wonder if that is what we’re trying to get out. When we talk about Christian meditation, it’s that intentionally putting hearts and minds of thought processes upon upon Jesus Christ.

Leah Sax:
So my question is, what does that actually look like? I must confess that as someone who’s been in Bible believing circles for for a fair bit of time, it’s not really a word I’ve heard used and may either.

Amy Wicks:
Can I say. Yeah, like I not sure

Adam Curtis:
so I have to take responsibility for this. I was the one who was it was thinking through. Okay. What are your great like foundational skills for helping new Christians sort of grow but very, very aware that meditation isn’t the one we talk about very much. But actually it is sort of the great bridge builder between reading God’s word and between our prayer lives. It’s a thing which stops us reading God’s word, becoming just an academic exercise. Because I was reflecting on my first degree in theology. There was lots of God’s word going around. It wasn’t like we were void of scripture. There was very little actual meditating or upon his being upon his character, nearly none, which actually led to practical change in how we lived very little, which really led to us worshipping him. So it’s very easy to have lots of the Bible, but to have for it not actually take any root. Yes, that’s why I was like. Now, I think meditation is a crucial part of us.

Amy Wicks:
I think that’s Right. I think one of myself sort of pondering recently is whether that’s partly because we’re not great at dealing with some parts of scripture that are more. With the poetry, basically, and scripture, so we like to understand things that are kind of straightforward arguments and things that can be picked apart or kind of give us statements of truth. But actually, massive, massive chunks of the Bible are written in poetry, huge amounts of the Bible are written with imagery and metaphor and are trying to… They’re not trying to teach us facts in a way that means we could pass an exam, but it’s written in a way that is, I think, trying to open our eyes to the reality of the world we live in and the reality of who God is. But in this way, that is crying out for us to kind of use our imaginations and let the kind of pictures swirl around and help us understand things that actually God has decided that he is going to communicate to us in poetry.

Leah Sax:
Wicksy, it’s So interesting you say that it’s easier to get into something you can pull apart like a gospel, and it’s slightly more difficult to get to the poetry because for me personally, I find it completely the other way around. I see the imagery in the imagination. It’s just the way the way God created me. I can really relate to that. Where should we then start this practice of meditation? I mean, is the Psalms a good place to start or how do you go about going? Right. You know, it’s 12:00 p.m. on a Thursday afternoon. How do I meditate? How do we start?

Amy Wicks:
This is I think where it gets a little bit tricky because we’re talking about something that is quite internal and have to be quite meandering. Like there’s not a five step process to Christian meditation.

Adam Curtis:
How we wish there was.

Amy Wicks:
How We wish there was, but I think it means cheering. I was going to use the phrase chewing over ideas. Do you understand what I mean by that kind of? Finding ideas in the Bible and things that are true that are perhaps put in a way that that we think, you know, I would never have described it like that or that’s quite surprising or what does that matter for me? So maybe we read a poem and lots of them are called Psalms in the Old Testament. That’s a word for word for a song. I’m learning how to read Hebrew at college. And in my Hebrew class, we were looking at one of these poems. The poet was talking about his enemies and describing them as running a plow up and down his back and the plowed furrows up and down his back. What is going on there? Like what? What does that mean? But actually, it is in the in the classes we just sat in this I mean, it was literally two little lines of poetry, but we just talked about it for a while. Somebody used the language of scarring. So if you imagine a farmers plow kind of up and down your back, it’s really vivid imagery. And you think, oh, yeah, that really describes for me the hurt that I feel when people are enemies is a strong word, isn’t it? But maybe being hostile to me. And then the idea of like a plow going up and down and like lengthening the furrows just had this imagery of kind of it was going on for a long time and it was getting worse. And all we’re doing there is just sitting in the kind of picture language and saying, what is it trying to convey? What is it trying to help me understand about the experience of in this situation of having an enemy that’s like persecuting me or something? How does it help me kind of kind of let it get under the skin of it and understand it in a true way? I was just sitting there and thinking, oh, hang on a minute, what does he actually mean here?

Leah Sax:
Wicksy I really like the way that you just were talking about kind of chewing something over turning, turning something over, looking at God’s word in that way

Amy Wicks:
Meditating! Yes, what we’re talking about.

Leah Sax:
Yeah, I like the way he talked about meditating. Just to look into that a bit further, is meditation the same as quiet time, which is a time or devotionals, however term you choose to use? Or is the time with the Lord different to meditation?

Amy Wicks:
Yeah, it’s a good question. Yeah, quiet time. I mean, that’s that’s a phrase that’s not in the Bible, so I always find it quite often. So what is a quiet time? And I’ll be honest. So some people talk about devotions. It’s another word. So again, that’s a bit jargony. I’ve got no idea what they mean. They’re basically we’re talking about some time, every day or regularly kind of engaging with God’s word in some way that is personal and sort of concentrated in some way. Is meditation part of part of quiet time? I’ve been trying to make it more to the substance of my morning devotions, and interestingly, it’s meant that my quiet times have stopped being quiet because I’ve started reading out loud,

Leah Sax:
That’s awesome ,

Amy Wicks:
Which I found really helpful and full of concentration because I’m a terrible reader. So top tip. If you find reading a column in scripture of the Bible hard, and if I read it out loud, it helps me. Now, that won’t be the case for everyone. Have an noisy time. By all means. I’m a big fan and what I am trying to do is more and more these days is to focus on kind of quality rather than quantity of Bible that I am engaging with rather than a quiet time in the morning being a kind of an exercise where I tackle another bit and I tick it off and I’ll answer some questions or read another chapter. And actually, well, I’m much more inclined to see these days is to go over and over a small bit of the Bible and try and let it sink in, in my mind more.

Leah Sax:
When you talk about going over something again and again, going over and over to let it sink in, do you mean that just in your time of devotion in the morning or whenever you do a devotional time or do you mean kind of when you’re going through your day, when you’re going for the bus, when you’re hoping to Morrison’s, is it all day or is it just kind of in that sit down time with the Lord?

Amy Wicks:
Yeah, I suppose it’s kind of deliberate in the mornings because I’ve got some time. I make sure I get up in time to give some time to this so I can be deliberate and at those times. But then one of the outworking of staying in the same bit of the Bible for a while and letting it kind of really get into my mind is that I’m then able to think about it the time it’s swimming around a bit more. And so I think there’s probably a connection between the both that we have scripture in our mind so that when we go for a walk around the park, we can kind of be letting it like percolate and just what, you know, what was going on there, or if you’re in a difficult situation or a hard circumstance or you’re finding something upsetting, you want to be able to remember it and kind of have a thinking chewing over moment or let something that you’ve read into a situation you’re in. But it got to be there in in the first very deliberate and spontaneous. And they work together.

Adam Curtis:
That’s really helpful because you see, you’re saying that like that rings true. I’ve got a strong, vivid image of me walking down one of my streets in that Tonbridge Wells, which was where where I grew up and feeling very overwhelmed by past guilt. But I knew the Lord Jesus. I trusted Jesus I was feeling overwhelmed by this past and the verse, which I just sort of kept on having to sort of repeat, was like Romans eight, like verse one. Therefore, there is no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. And I think what I was doing in that moment was meditating upon that verse and letting the richness of God’s word speak into this past guilt and and fundamentally, it was a letting God would vanquish it,

Amy Wicks:
But it was something you knew already. And, you know, moments when. Yeah, when you find being a Christian hard or in circumstances maybe where someone’s really hurt me and I’ve been just upset and and grappling with that, being able to find kind of favourite bits of the Bible that have real words of comfort from God in them to go to them and let them. Yeah. Comfort me in those moments has been really, really important. There’s one psalm in my I’ve got a Bible that I use in the mornings for the meditation time that I highlight, and I kind of don’t mind.

Amy Wicks:
Graffitiing.

Graffitiing, great word. And yeah, this one is one that is a wrinkly page because I just cried over it once. It was it was a really important moment and the words were really, really helped me kind of hold on to well, I think God was holding onto me. I was just being helped to remember that Jesus is trustworthy and good in a time of real kind of heartbreak and hurt. And it was just letting those words connect to that moment in life. And I think that’s what we keep. We sort of we keep we keep coming back to this conversation is no, it’s not it’s not kind of separating us from our daily circumstances where the instances are happy or sad. And so it’s not that I’m as a Christian, I’ve got my, like, head in the clouds and just I’m in some weird spiritual state that means things don’t affect me. But actually, life is really and kind of gritty and stuff affects me and goes through had kind of really connects in those moments. And helps me go through them, trusting God and understanding what it means for him to be good in that moment. And that is very real and very raw, I think, and is one of I think, the real joys of being being a Christian when you’re like, actually, this is this is life.

Leah Sax:
Yes.

Amy Wicks:
This is what Jesus meant us for. Like when Jesus says, I came to give you life in life to the full, he doesn’t mean like extreme snowboarding or whatever it is. But I think he means kind of making life as real as possible and knowing that that he is kind of Lord over it

Adam Curtis:
Yeah And meeting us, that Jesus meets us in the gritty dirt of everyday life and it is the image of the Christian life, is just two people walking together and we’re hearing the Lord speak day in, day out and the highs and the lows and the way that we’re hearing the Lord speak when we really taking truths of scripture we hear in a Sunday, we’re reading a quiet time, but directly apply connect. I love it when you say connect directly connect into it. That felt moment. Yeah.

Leah Sax:
Sometimes it can feel hard to get down into that meditation time, and I think hopefully we will be the first to admit that that were not all frequent meditators in that kind of sense. Wicksy you just wonder, do you have any practical tips on how we could go about doing that?

Amy Wicks:
Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And I know I’ve been skirting around trying to be practical because I don’t I don’t want to be too regimented in what we’re saying about this, because we’re talking about a kind of lifetime of enjoying God’s word. And letting it connect, I will give you one one practical thing that I found helpful in the past, and that is to use Psalm 119, perhaps as a starting point to kind of grow in our love for God’s word and are thinking about how it connects to life. Why Psalm 119. It’s the longest psalm. It’s absolutely massive. It’s and it’ll be several pages in your Bible. Or you can you can find it online. And when you look at it, you’ll notice that it’s broken up into little sections. So it’s already is broken into little chunks for you and each chunk is kind of eight verses long. I think it’s an acrostic is one of those. Each bit starts with a different letter. So that’s why they break it up like that. It’s a massive Psalm, but it’s all about one topic. And the one topic is about is God in his word and how that relates to being a Christian and kind of how what God says should be kind of permeating every every part of the Christian’s life. It is kind of like a meditation in itself, because it just ponders on this topic of God’s word and the Christian from different angles and with different images and different words. But what you could do is take one of the sections each each morning or each day and just hear what God has to say about how we relate to him through his word and then turn it back into a prayer to him and ask him to help you.

Amy Wicks:
Just see how that goes, because there are tiny sections. It’s not going to take a bit of time every morning. You’re not kind of jumping in at the deep end. It’s totally manageable. It’s one topic. So this idea of just chewing something over for a whole month, that’s really helpful that the Bible already has given us a little kind of set meditation on this topic. And if you get to the end of a month, or four weeks of doing it and you you start to find it helpful, can I suggest you just go back to it and do it all over again. You know, this isn’t a quick there’s no kind of HIT routine for the devotions. We’re talking about something that is long term. I mean, I do a little bit of HIT every now and again and. Yeah, but that that’s not how it works with the Bible. And we’re talking about slow, slow progress, but that doesn’t mean it’s not good progress. And we’re talking about something that’s quite internal and unseen, but it’s going to be really kind of fruitful over the long term. So Psalm 119 one one nine, that’s where I’d start.

Adam Curtis:
Oh, Amy Wicks, that session was so helpful, so good.

Leah Sax:
She’s such a legend,

Adam Curtis:
Such a legend, just such a wealth of knowledge and an experience

Leah Sax:
Yet as pearl after pearl coming out, isn’t it? Let me take that down!

Adam Curtis:
You what I particularly love just reflecting. And she’s just threw in that phrase like, slow progress doesn’t mean it’s not good progress. Actually, this vision of the Christian life, sometimes we want it to be like a sprint. I get the I get the complete 100 meters. It’s done. We’ve got the gold. But actually, it it it is a marathon and slowly dwelling upon God’s word and realising that it’s going to slowly changes.

Leah Sax:
Yeah, I was really thinking about a similar thing. You know, we’re filling our minds, our souls with God’s word, and that is slowly changing us from the inside out. And that is a continuing journey. It’s not kind of a one step solution. It’s not a hit workout. It really is something for the long term. I mean, it almost feels like an investment, doesn’t it? But it’s so countercultural when everything is instant gratification. And when you’re like, this is a slow and steady race. It’s a life journey she was talking about,

Adam Curtis:
which Makes so much sense that we’re in a relationship with the Lord God and actually relationships that not just about the wedding day, they’re about all the years, which are going to come after them.

Leah Sax:
Now, Wicks, we love to ask our guests one kind of extra bonus question, and that question is Amy Wicks. What advice would you give to your younger self?

Amy Wicks:
Yeah, and I think it relates to what we were talking about earlier, about kind of intellectual humility and realising that there’s progress to be made. And I think I would say to my kind of young new Christian self, realise that you are on a lifetime’s journey to get to know Jesus and eventually be with him. And you have taken the first steps. But think of it as a lifetime’s journey, kind of up a mountain to be with him and let that picture help you persevere. So don’t expect it to be all hunky dory straight away. Don’t expect that you’re going to have all the answers, but be excited about the journey, because actually that that journey is how how God is going to shape you and it’s going to take a whole lifetime.

Leah Sax:
Thank you so much to Amy Wicks for her time and wisdom today, if you’d like to dig in more into the topic of meditation, you can find a blog by Adam on the Delight podcast Web site. And indeed, we’d love to hear from you. You can find us on Instagram @Delightpodcast. And our email is Hello at Delightpodcast. Dotcom, if you fancy Twitter and Facebook, just search delight podcast. If you think what you’ve heard today might be of interest to others, please do like share and subscribe. This is Adam and Leah delightfully signing off.

Adam Curtis:
Bye

Leah Sax:
See you next time bye.

One thought on “TRANSCRIPT Episode 2: Meditation – dwelling on Gods truth

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: